3084th OPERATIONS SQUADRON (3097th AVIATION DEPOT SQUADRON) - MISSION

The following Mission Statements for the 3084th Operations Squadron (name later changed to the 3097th Aviation Depot Squadron) were taken from the Historical Reports of the 3084th Aviation Depot Group, recently declassified by the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the United States Air Force.

(1 Jan - 30 June 1956)

MISSION

            The mission of the Directorate of Operations is to perform special weapons activities for the 3084th Aviation Depot Group (AMC), including such activities as:  the receipt, handling, assembly and testing of atomic and/or thermonuclear weapons; delivery of the completed weapons to the adjacent Air Force Base and transfer of the units to the tactical organization.  In addition, this organization supports the Emergency War Plans of higher headquarters and implements the AEC storage inspection program.  The Directorate of Operations plans, evaluates and coordinates such plans, orders, reports and statistical data as are needed to publish appropriate directives, operations plans and operations orders for the Group.  It further prepares, coordinates and conducts programs relating to radiological defense, disaster and training, and functions as the operations representative on the staff of the Group Commander.

(WILL BE ADDING ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL SECTION AS TIME PERMITS.)

(1 July - 31 December 1956)

MISSION

            (Ed. Note:  The mission statement for this period begins exactly as the previous period, so is not repeated here. The next section is a new addition for this period.)

            In order to accomplish this mission during operational alerts, the Operations Squadron is divided into two (2) equal strength alert shifts ("A" and "B").  Each shift is alternately on a four (4) hour and a twelve (12) hour alert recall.  Accordingly, personnel on a four hour recall alert have a maximum allowable time of four hours, measuring from the receipt of an action message, to report for and begin work.  A twelve hour recall alert shift is subject to the same conditions with the exception that they have a maximum of twelve (12) hours from the receipt of an action message to report for duty in the event operational requirements continue for twelve (12) or more hours.  The alert shift on four hour recall status changes at 1200 hours (local) Wednesday of each week.  This alert system, though binding, has sufficient flexibility to allow rather lengthy excursions for shopping and/or recreational purposes, provided the alerter is aware of his alertee's position at all times.

(WILL BE ADDING ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL SECTION AS TIME PERMITS.)

(1 Jan - 30 June 1957)

MISSION

            The mission of the 3097th Aviation Depot Squadron is to perform special weapon operations of the 3084th Aviation Depot Group (AMC), including such activities as: the receipt, handling, assembly, and testing of atomic and/or TN weapons; delivery of the completed weapons to the adjacent Air Force Base, and transfer of the units to the tactical using organization. In addition, this organization supports the Emergency War Plans of higher headquarters, and implements the AEC Storage Inspection program. All operations plans and operations orders for the Group are published through the Directorate of Operations. All plans and orders published are evaluated and coordinated from pertinent reports and statistical data as are necessary. The Directorate of Operations further prepares and conducts programs relative to radiological defense, disaster, and training; and also functions as the operations representative on the staff of the Group Commander.

            The accomplishment of the mission stated above occupies this organization 24 hours per day. For this reason, an alert system was established to enable this Station to meet any requirements as directed. During the period of 1 January 1957 through 15 May 1957, this schedule consisted of two equal shifts, one on four hour recall, the other on twelve hour recall. As was the policy in the past, the recall schedule was alternated weekly to give all personnel equal responsibility. On 16 May 1957, anticipating that the 99th Bomb Wing at Westover would become operational and would be endeavoring to increase their combat readiness, the recall schedule was changed to one hour and twelve hours respectively. The same conditions governed the operation of the changed schedule as did the less restrictive four and twelve hour plans.

ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL

            At the beginning of the reporting period, this Squadron was designated the 3084th Operations Squadron. On 11 February 1957, the Squadron was redesignated as the 3084th Aviation Depot Squadron by AMC General Order No. 7 (Ed. Note: This document is unreadable.), and again on 8 April 1957 it was redesignated the 3097th Aviation Depot Squadron by AMC General Order No. 23. These changes were merely in name and there were no personnel or command changes affected by the orders.

            Major Robert F. Hilbun continued through this reporting period as Squadron Commander. Major Hilbun also performed duties as Director of Operations and as such, directed and supervised the Directorate of Operations at Group level. He provided staff direction and supervision for the organization, including planning and coordinating within the Operations Division, so as to meet the operations requirements phase of the Group Mission.

            The Operations Staff Division, as established prior to the period of this report and whose functions have been outlined in previous reports, continued to function so as to insure efficient operation of the Division and proper coordination of relative operational procedures.

            The following named officers were assigned the indicated duties within the Squadron Staff.  Operations and Plans Officer: Captain Thomas G. Ray, 1 January 57 to 18 February 57; Major Charles D. Porter, Jr., 18 February 57 to present. Assembly Division Officer: Captain Homer H. Ozenghar, 1 February 57 to present. Handling Division: Captain Marion P. Slatter, 1 January 57 to 18 February 57; Captain Frederick E. Diffendale, 18 February 57 to present. Administration:  M/Sgt. Walter A. McNulty for the entire period.

            It should be noted at this point that the office of the Assembly Division Chief was established by 3079th Wing Regulation 20-9, dated 4 January 1957.

            Captain H. H. Ozenghar, who up to this time had been Plant II Assembly Division Officer, became Chief, Assembly Division on 1 February 57. His assistant, Captain James C. Fulton, who had been Plant I Assembly Division Officer, was designated Assistant Chief, Assembly Division.

            Under the Operations and Plans Division, the following officers held positions as indicated. Plans Officer: 1/Lt Gerald B. Connor as an additional duty from 1 January 57 to 18 February 57; Captain Thomas G. Ray from 18 February 57 to 2 April 57; 1/Lt Gerald B. Connor from 2 April 57 to 11 June 57; Captain George P. W. Williams from 12 June 57 to present. Production Control, Scheduling, and Training: CWO-W2 Paul J. DeNoon for the entire reporting period.

            Further, major divisions formerly designated as Type I and Type II Division were changed on 1 February 57 to simply Plant I (AW) and Plant II (TN). For the remainder of the period, these two organizations were directly under the supervision of the Chief, Assembly Division. Handling was an independent division whose Chief had equal status with the three other divisions under the Commander.

            In the last report, the importance of the nuclear section made its inclusion in the history virtually mandatory. This section's activities for this report were, however, included in the history of Plant I, for it was into this organization that the Nuclear Division, as well as Maintenance and Calibration, were absorbed.

            Morale of the Squadron personnel has been generally high during the period 1 January 57 through 30 June 57. The problems previously encountered concerning the overages created by the UMD of 16 November 56 were still present, however, the general strength level remained relatively constant with losses closely following gains. After consulting with the Group Personnel Officer, it was determined that although there had been no significant changes during this period in Squadron strength, this organization would in time be brought nearer to the authorized levels.

            A fact of significance which should be mentioned here is that although the Squadron was over-strength on paper, this organization still had many responsibilities which could be met only with difficulty if its actual strength were diminished appreciably. As an example, although the Nuclear, and Maintenance and Calibration Sections no longer existed as separate entities, there was still a need for personnel of these sections to perform nuclear as well as maintenance and calibration duties. The Squadron still retained the responsibility for carrying out these duties while being reduced in authorized strength.

            Just as in the past reporting period, Squadron participation in Non-Commissioned Officer Academies was high. Each class throughout the period had at least one man from this organization on its roster. A total of seven NCO's attended these schools, either reporting to the 8th Air Force NCO Academy at Westover Air Force Base, or to the AMC NCO Academy at Fairfield Air Force Station, California. Interest in the school has been high and those NCO's eligible have been most anxious to attend.

            During this reporting period, four officers attended Squadron Officer's School at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. Lts. Robert L. Humphreys, Louis F. X. Ryan, and Peter N. Micale graduated from Class 57-A.  Lt. Donald C. Baker attended Class 57-B.  Upon his graduation, Lt. Baker was reassigned to the Air Force Institute of Technology for a course of studies in electrical engineering.

            Division training will be discussed within each Division's section of this Historical Report. General Military Training (GMT) has progressed at a satisfactory rate throughout the period 1 January 57 through 30 June 57.

            An organizational chart is appended to give present Squadron structure. (Ed. Note:  Chart is unreadable.)

(1 July - 31 December 1957)

MISSION

            The mission of the 3097th Aviation Depot Squadron is to perform the special weapon operations of the 3084th Aviation Depot Group (AMC), including such activities as:  The receipt, handling, assembly, and testing of atomic and/or thermonuclear weapons; delivery of the completed weapons to the adjacent Air Force Base; and transfer of the units to the tactical using organization. In addition, this organization supports the Emergency War Plans of higher headquarters, implements the AEC Storage inspection program, and supports Air Defense Command organizations by performing initial receipt inspections and giving support maintenance on nuclear warheads.  All operations plans and operations orders for the Group are published by the Directorate of Operations. All plans and orders are evaluated end coordinated from pertinent reports and statistical data as are necessary.

            The accomplishment of the Mission stated above occupies 24 hours per day.  For this reason, an alert system was established to enable this station to meet any requirements as directed. During the period of 1 July 1957 through 31 December 1957 (except during times of increased readiness as noted under "Operations"), the schedule implementing this system consisted of two equal shifts, one on four hour recall, the other on twelve hour recall. This schedule is alternated weekly between the two shifts.

ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL

            Major Robert F. Hilbun was Commander of the 3097th ADS at the beginning of this reporting period. On 5 August, Major Melvin O. Koerth took command  and retained this position through the balance of the year.

            The Commander of the Aviation Depot Squadron also functions as Director of Operations at Group level. As the Director of Operations he is responsible to the Group Commander for the proper planning and execution of Emergency War Plans for the Group.

            To most effectively perform its mission, the squadron is subdivided into three divisions. "Operations and Plans", "Assembly", and "Handling". The Chief of each division is responsible to the Commander for the proper execution of his portion of the squadron mission. The Operations and Flans Division also functions as the Directorate of Operations .  Since the Operations and Plans Division's mission and duties parallel that of the squadron's it will be discussed along with the squadron in general. The other two divisions will be discussed under their own sub-heading.  (View Organizational Chart, 1 Oct 57)

            The following named officers were assigned the indicated duties within the squadron staff: Operations & Plans Officer - Major Charles D. Porter, 1 Jul 57 to 15 Oct 57; Major Joseph A. Berger, 16 Oct 57 to present; Assembly Division Officer - Major Robert C. Lucadello, 1 Jul 57 to 17 Sep 57; Major Joseph P. Fodor, 17 Sep 57 to present; Handling Division Officer - Capt Frederick E. Diffendale, 1 Jul 57 to present; Administration (First Sergeant) - MSgt Walter A. McNulty for the entire period.

            Under the Operations and Plans Division the following officers held positions as indicated: Plans Officer - Capt George P. W. Williams for the entire period; Production Control, Scheduling and Training - CWO-W2 Ernest S. Hall for the entire period. Capt Frederick E. Diffendale held the additional duty of Operations Officer in this division for the entire period.

            As the requirements for an active nuclear section faded away, a new requirement grew even larger to take its place. This is the W-25 Warhead support program. This program has demanded a great deal of attention from the squadron as a whole, requiring a new line of check sheets, storage and handling procedures, SOPS, and a large increase in TDY to ADC Bases requiring this support. Additional details will be covered under Assembly Division.

            Morale of the squadron personnel has been generally high during this period. There has been no change to the UMD and the overage in personnel experienced et the beginning of the period has gradually decreased until the UMD and actual strength are approximately equal.

            Squadron participation in Non-Commissioned Officer academies remained high during this period. Seven NCOs attended these schools either reporting to the 8th Air Force NCO Academy at Westover Air Force Base, or to the AMC NCO Academy at Fairfield Air Force Station, California. Interest in the school has been high and although there were no first place honor students from the squadron one man did place second.

            One officer, 1st Lt Stuart M. Andrews, attended Squadron Officers School at Maxwell AFB, Alabama, graduating with Class 57-C

            The Operations and Flans Division monitors the Squadron Training program, both General Military and Technical. A change to the previous method of conducting General Military Training was effected. The annual requirements are being accomplished each six month period with the exception of Commander's Call and Security Indoctrination which are held one (1) hour monthly. The lecture held during the second six month period is for newly assigned personnel and those who did not attend the previous lecture. It is believed that this method will insure a greater percentage of participation. In the field of Technical Training all requirements of Wing Regulation 52-3 were met. A total of seven airmen were upgraded through OJT. At the close of this period seven additional airmen are on OJT for upgrading. All these personnel are in the 331XX and 463XX field.

(1 Jan - 30 June 1958)

MISSION

            The mission of the 3097th Aviation Depot Squadron is to perform the special weapons operations of the 3084th Aviation Depot Group (AMC).  These operations include the receipt, handling, assembly, and testing of nuclear weapons; delivery of the completed weapons to the adjacent Air Force Base; and transfer of the units to the using tactical organization.  In addition, this organization supports the emergency war plans of higher headquarters, implements the AEC Storage Inspection program, supports Air Defense Command organizations by performing initial receipt inspections and giving support maintenance on nuclear warheads.  The Directorate of Operations is responsible for the preparation of all operations plans and orders for the Group; these plans and orders are evaluated and coordinated from pertinent reports and statistical data as appropriate.

            To accomplish the mission stated above, this station was operative 24 hours per day; and for this reason an alert system was in effect which enabled this station to meet all directed requirements.  During the period of this report the squadron was organized into equal shifts of personnel - One shift subject to four hour recall; one shift subject to twelve hour recall.  The shifts were alternated weekly.  During operational exercises the off-duty shift was placed on one hour alert. (Uncl)

ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL

            Major Melvin O. Koerth commanded the 3097th Aviation Depot Squadron through the entire reporting period.  The Commander of the squadron also functioned as Director of Operations for the 3084th Aviation Depot Group and is responsible to the Group Commander for proper planning and execution of emergency war plans for the group. (Uncl)

            To effectively perform its mission, the squadron was divided into three divisions - "Operations & Plans", "Assembly", and "Handling".  The Chief of each division was responsible to the Commander for the proper execution of his portion of the squadron mission.  Since the Operations and Plens Division's duties paralleled those of the squadron, the two will be combined for this discussion.  The Assembly and Handling Divisions will be discussed under their own heading. (Uncl)

            The following squadron staff officers occupied positions and performed duties as indicated:

                    Chief, Operations & Plans: Major Joseph A. Berger (entire reporting period)

                    Chief, Assembly Division: Major Joseph P. Fodor (entire reporting period)

                    Chief, Handling Division: Capt Frederick E. Diffendale (1 Jan 58 to 9 Feb 58)

                                                           Capt Ernest R. Bradley (10 Feb 58 thru 30 Jun 58)

                    Administration (First Sergeant): MSgt Walter A. McNulty (entire reporting period) (Uncl)

            In the Operations and Plans Division, the following officers held positions as indicated:

                    Plans Officer: Capt George P. W. Williams (entire reporting period)

                    Production Control, Scheduling & Training: CWO-W2 Ernest S. Hall (entire reporting period)

                    Current Operations Officer: Capt Frederick E. Diffendale (additional duty assigned 1 Jan 58 to 9 Feb 58)

                    Capt Ernest R. Bradley (additional duty assigned 10 Feb 58 thru 30 Jun 58) (Uncl)

            The W-25 Support Program (reference history for period 1 Jul 57 to 31 Dec 57) continued to occupy a prominent position in the squadron activities; however, the demands for TDY of squadron personnel gradually decreased as Air Defense Command bases assumed a limited maintenance capability.

            The morale of squadron personnel has been generally high during this period.  There were no changes to the Unit Manning Document and the squadron strength remained close to authorized levels throughout the period. (Uncl)

TRAINING

            The policy of sending one airman per month to the AMC-NCO Academy, Fairfield Station, California; was continued during this period.  One Master Sergeant attended the 8th Air Force NCO Academy, Westover AFB, Mass.  Major Melvin O. Koerth and Major Joseph P. Fodor attended the Air Warfare System Orientation Course, Maxwell AFB, Alabama.  Captain Gregory E. Loucks attended a Passive Defense course at Lowry AFB, Colorado.  Major Melvin O. Koerth attended a Quality Control Indoctrination course, Kelly AFB, Texas.   Capt William G. Rogers attended a jet qualification course at Craig AFB, Alabama.   Major Joseph A. Berger made a staff visit to Fairfield Air Force Station, California and Deep Creek Air Force Station, Washington to coordinate operations matters and mutual problems. (Uncl)

            The Training Officer, Operations and Plans Division, monitors the squadron training program.  General Military Training and Technical Training have been accomplished as outlined in 3079th Aviation Depot Wing Regulation 50-3 and 52-3.   Four airmen were upgraded to AFSC 33170 and two airmen were upgraded to AFSC 46370 through on-the-job training. (Uncl)